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  • #1 by GradStdnt on 01 May 2015
  • I thought this was interesting.  We have watched CEO's receive obscene bonuses even when they suck and under perform.  The banking crDAESH was a prime example.  Think this may help?

    http://america.aljazeera.com/articles/2015/4/29/sec-proposes-new-rules-on-ceo-pay.html

    Public companies in the United States would be required to disclose how the pay of their top executives squares with their overall performance under new rules proposed on Wednesday.
    The draft measure by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission sparked sharp divisions among the agency's five commissioners, with its two Republicans saying it is too prescriptive, overly broad and should not be a top priority on the agency's rule-making agenda.
    The proposal calls for companies to provide a table in their proxy statements that contains the total compensation actually paid to their principal executives, the total shareholder return on an annual basis, and the shareholder return on an annual basis of peer group companies, among other things.
    Companies would also have to provide details on the average compensation paid out for other named executive officers, such as chief financial officers.
    Large and mid-sized companies would have to provide the disclosures for the past five fiscal years, and smaller companies would need to offer three fiscal years worth of data.
    Smaller companies would not have to provide a peer group comparison.
    "It should make it easier for shareholders to locate, understand, and analyze executive compensation information before they have to vote," said SEC Commissioner Kara Stein, a Democrat, who supports the plan.
    The SEC's plan is part of a package of executive compensation disclosures required by the 2010 Dodd-Frank reform law.
    The agency previously proposed several other measures related to compensation disclosures.
    Although some of them have managed to get adopted, such as rules that require shareholder votes on executive pay and "golden parachute" compensation packages, others have remained mired in controversy.
    One rule that has yet to be adopted, for instance, calls for companies to disclose the ratio between the chief executive's compensation and the median total compensation for all other employees.
    Organized labor groups such as the AFL-CIO strongly support the CEO pay ratio rule, but Republicans and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce have staunchly opposed it.
    The SEC's two Republicans said on Wednesday they felt the rule represents a "one-size-fits-all" approach that could confuse investors.
    They also lamented that smaller companies were not exempted from the rule.
    Reuters
  • #2 by Franco on 01 May 2015
  • I thought this was interesting.  We have watched CEO's receive obscene bonuses even when they suck and under perform.  The banking crDAESH was a prime example.  Think this may help?

    http://america.aljazeera.com/articles/2015/4/29/sec-proposes-new-rules-on-ceo-pay.html

    Public companies in the United States would be required to disclose how the pay of their top executives squares with their overall performance under new rules proposed on Wednesday.
    The draft measure by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission sparked sharp divisions among the agency's five commissioners, with its two Republicans saying it is too prescriptive, overly broad and should not be a top priority on the agency's rule-making agenda.
    The proposal calls for companies to provide a table in their proxy statements that contains the total compensation actually paid to their principal executives, the total shareholder return on an annual basis, and the shareholder return on an annual basis of peer group companies, among other things.
    Companies would also have to provide details on the average compensation paid out for other named executive officers, such as chief financial officers.
    Large and mid-sized companies would have to provide the disclosures for the past five fiscal years, and smaller companies would need to offer three fiscal years worth of data.
    Smaller companies would not have to provide a peer group comparison.
    "It should make it easier for shareholders to locate, understand, and analyze executive compensation information before they have to vote," said SEC Commissioner Kara Stein, a Democrat, who supports the plan.
    The SEC's plan is part of a package of executive compensation disclosures required by the 2010 Dodd-Frank reform law.
    The agency previously proposed several other measures related to compensation disclosures.
    Although some of them have managed to get adopted, such as rules that require shareholder votes on executive pay and "golden parachute" compensation packages, others have remained mired in controversy.
    One rule that has yet to be adopted, for instance, calls for companies to disclose the ratio between the chief executive's compensation and the median total compensation for all other employees.
    Organized labor groups such as the AFL-CIO strongly support the CEO pay ratio rule, but Republicans and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce have staunchly opposed it.
    The SEC's two Republicans said on Wednesday they felt the rule represents a "one-size-fits-all" approach that could confuse investors.
    They also lamented that smaller companies were not exempted from the rule.
    Reuters


    CEO's are almost an exclusive club as I have worked with many in the telecom arena and they seemingly wreck a company into bankruptcy, lose their job with a huge severance pay and take over another telecom within a year...very amazing.

    What is really astonishing is that until just this past month, the National Football League was declared a non-profit organization thus tax exempt....is that the most unbelievable thing you have ever heard of???? 

    They haven't been paying taxes all these years and this is a multi-billion dollar enterprise...

    I think they even have churches beat on this one...well, close anyway...lol
  • #3 by GradStdnt on 01 May 2015
  • CEO's are almost an exclusive club as I have worked with many in the telecom arena and they seemingly wreck a company into bankruptcy, lose their job with a huge severance pay and take over another telecom within a year...very amazing.

    What is really astonishing is that until just this past month, the National Football League was declared a non-profit organization thus tax exempt....is that the most unbelievable thing you have ever heard of???? 

    They haven't been paying taxes all these years and this is a multi-billion dollar enterprise...

    I think they even have churches beat on this one...well, close anyway...lol

    CEO's are just industry whores...I see it in the for-profit colleges I teach.  We have a mantra...be careful who you piss off...next year they could be your boss.   ;D  They move from place to place..with dismal performance records, protect themselves with golden parachutes and rape and pillage every organization they touch. 

    This is pretty funny...
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ST_yofEmPPY


  • #4 by Imajeenyus on 01 May 2015
  • CEO's are almost an exclusive club as I have worked with many in the telecom arena and they seemingly wreck a company into bankruptcy, lose their job with a huge severance pay and take over another telecom within a year...very amazing.

    What is really astonishing is that until just this past month, the National Football League was declared a non-profit organization thus tax exempt....is that the most unbelievable thing you have ever heard of???? 

    They haven't been paying taxes all these years and this is a multi-billion dollar enterprise...

    I think they even have churches beat on this one...well, close anyway...lol
    I agree.
  • #5 by Franco on 01 May 2015
  • CEO's are just industry whores...I see it in the for-profit colleges I teach.  We have a mantra...be careful who you piss off...next year they could be your boss.   ;D  They move from place to place..with dismal performance records, protect themselves with golden parachutes and rape and pillage every organization they touch. 

    This is pretty funny...
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ST_yofEmPPY

    Schools are just as bad...they apply for non-profit status, keep it tied up in courts for years and then when declared illegal, they close shop and run away with all the gov't sponsored funding for the students...this is what I am dealing with right now with one of my kids...none of his credits are transferable due to the school closing and he never finished from the closing...I have to apply to get my 30k back I forked over.

    I hope it goes through...
  • #6 by GradStdnt on 01 May 2015
  • Schools are just as bad...they apply for non-profit status, keep it tied up in courts for years and then when declared illegal, they close shop and run away with all the gov't sponsored funding for the students...this is what I am dealing with right now with one of my kids...none of his credits are transferable due to the school closing and he never finished from the closing...I have to apply to get my 30k back I forked over.

    I hope it goes through...

    The for-profits that were publicly traded were the worse...the darlings of Wallstreet..and many of them are gone now.  I did a teach out once for one that closed and I am surprised that they did not find another school for your son to finish or just taught out the last enrolled cohort.  Teach outs are what is usually done when one closes.  Did he attend a Cordon Bleu' college? 
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